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Flamenco glossary

 

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Malagueñas
1) (Regional style) (Song and dance form) These danceable, lighthearted songs evolved from the Verdiales and have a similar rhythm and form. According to Juan Serrano, the well known semi-classical Malagueña by the Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona is based on the regional style of Malagueña. Donn Pohren however, believes it was influenced by the Flamenco style. What can I say? Take your pick. 2) (flamenco style) (Song form. Cante jondo. Toque libre) This style of Malagueñas was created and developed by singers such as Juan Breva, and became very popular in the café cantante circuit in the late 19th century. Unlike the happy and lively style of the regional Malagueña, this freer style has a melancholy mood about it.

Martillo
Hammer. A rarely used alternative meaning the same as GOLPE.

Martillo stroke
Hammer stroke. This is a variation of the supported stroke (rest stroke) in guitar playing. While the rest stroke is executed with a curved finger, which flexes straight at the first two joints while playing a note, the martillo stroke begins with a straight finger and snaps down forcefully to the next lower string. The result is a strong sound of much greater volume than the traditional classical style rest stroke.

Martinetes
Songs of the blacksmiths. Songs accompanied by the sound of the blacksmiths hammer (martillo ) striking the anvil.See also TONAS

Mastil
Guitar neck, handle.

Mayor
Major key

Medio
Half. Middle finger. Right hand guitar notation symbol - indicated by a lower case 'm'.

Menor
Minor key

Milonga
(SONG FORM) This song form originated in Argentina. Played in 4/4 time in A minor, it is similar in some ways to the Farruca, except that the falsetas are more lyrical. It has syncopations and a mood of controlled passion reminiscent of the Tientos. The compás is variable: sometimes free, sometimes well defined. The song modulates from minor to major at certain times and in places displays distinct rhythmic and melodic reflections of the Argentinean Tango.

Mineras
(SONG FORM) The word comes from Minero (miner) and deals with mining themes as one would expect. It is one of the group of songs known as cantes de Levante.

Mirabrás
(Song and dance form) One of the group of songs known as Cantiñas. This is in many ways identical to Alegrías, but lacking the dynamic quality and grace.

Murcianas
(Song and dance form) One of the group of songs known as cantes de Levante.

Ole
An exclamation of approval or encouragement. Probably from the word 'Allah'.

 

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